Brotherly Love Report

Release

PHILADELPHIA–The City of Philadelphia has issued a brand-new report, Brotherly Love: Health of Black Men and Boys in Philadelphia. This first-ever report is intended to highlight the unique challenges faced by Black men in Philadelphia today and lay the groundwork for actionable steps we all can take to improve their health outcomes.

https://mailchi.mp/phila.gov/press-release-health-department-and-office-of-black-male-engagement-announce-first-ever-report-on-health-of-black-men-and-boys-in-philadelphia

WHYY

The full report, Brotherly Love: Health of Black Men and Boys in Philadelphia, is available for download. City epidemiologist Raynard Washington said the statistics are meant to serve as a kind of blueprint to direct resources.

“Black men represent 20 percent of the population in Philadelphia — that’s a large proportion, a large share of the population,” Washington said. “So really thinking about how do we ensure that there is a complete wraparound [of] both services as well as supports and opportunity for them is important.”

https://whyy.org/articles/new-report-grades-the-health-of-black-males-in-philadelphia/

By Jad Sleiman

Inquirer

“The first step to solving any problem is drawing attention to it,” said Thomas Farley, city health commissioner. “The Brotherly Love report shows that, while Philadelphia has many initiatives to promote health, African American men are still not as healthy as other demographic groups and not as healthy as they could be.”

https://www.philly.com/health/black-men-life-expectancy-philly-20190314.html

By Rita Giordano

Philly Voice

A new report released Thursday by Philadelphia health officials shines a direct spotlight on the challenges faced by the city’s black men and boys.

The inaugural report, dubbed “Brotherly Love: Health of Black Men and Boys in Philadelphia,” revealed a mixture of positive and negative health findings.

https://www.phillyvoice.com/life-expectancy-philly-black-men-racial-demographic-health-challenges/

By Jon Kopp

Philly Tribune

“Black men and boys have been experiencing disparate health outcomes for quite some time and in many areas we are seeing some improvements, “ said Dr. Raynard Washington, the Philadelphia Department of Public Health’s chief epidemiologist.

“In some ways, things are improving for Black men and boys, but there is still a gap between their health outcomes and others.”

 

Philadelphia Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Farley said in a news release, “The first step to solving any problem is drawing attention to it.

https://www.phillytrib.com/news/health/report-life-expectancy-for-black-men-is-lower-than-any/article_c99d33c3-a53b-5006-975d-d6e6ec7bce99.html

By Ayana Jones

Philadelphia Sun

The City of Philadelphia has issued a brand-new report, “Brotherly Love: Health of Black Men and Boys in Philadelphia.” This first-ever report is intended to highlight the unique challenges faced by Black men in Philadelphia today and lay the groundwork for actionable steps we all can take to improve their health outcomes.

https://www.philasun.com/health/philadelphia-issues-first-ever-report-on-the-health-outcomes-of-black-men-and-boys/

Community Health Needs Assessments

Raynard Washington, chief epidemiologist at the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, which leads the collaborative, said only a handful of communities across the country have taken such an approach, but the most obvious benefit is the reduction of duplicate efforts, costs and other burdens for those involved, including the communities.

“In most cases, health systems do not serve communities in isolation. As such, developing priorities and strategies to address community needs should not occur in isolation,” he said. “Our hope is that a collaborative assessment of priorities for improving the health and well-being of communities will result in further collaboration on implementing strategies to address those priorities.”

https://www.buckscountycouriertimes.com/news/20190308/hospitals-team-up-seek-input-on-communities-health-needs

By Jenny Wagner

Alleged South Philly Rapist

NBC10 1

The city’s health department also would not comment on Williams’ status, but said in a statement that “all the victims who have come forward are being offered the appropriate counseling and medical care.”

“We urge anyone who has been the victim of sexual assault to seek the proper medical care,” a spokesman for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health said in an emailed statement.

https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/HIV-South-Philadelphia-Sexual-Assault-Rape-Suspect-Safien-Williams-City-Worker-506515821.html

By Alicia Lozano

NBC10 2

The Philadelphia Department of Public Health did not comment on the Williams case, but said in a statement that “all the victims who have come forward are being offered the appropriate counseling and medical care.”

https://www.nbcphiladelphia.com/news/local/Philadelphia-Mayor-Jim-Kenney-Confirms-South-Philadelphia-Serial-Rape-Suspect-Safien-Williams-Has-HIV-506550111.html

By Alicia Lozano

Health of the City Media Coverage

Inquirer:

“What surprised me the most was the impact of the opioid crisis on our overall vital statistics,” Health Commissioner Tom Farley said Thursday. “To see life expectancy going in the wrong direction has not occurred in this country for a long time.”

http://www.philly.com/health/opioid-overdose-health-of-the-city-poverty-racial-disparities-philadelphia-20190104.html

By Aubrey Whelan

Philly Magazine:

The just-released Health of the City report found that drug overdose deaths among Philadelphia residents increased nearly four-fold in recent years, with those deaths making a resounding mark on the city’s overall life expectancy — specifically on the rate of premature deaths (those that occur before age 75).

https://www.phillymag.com/news/2019/01/04/life-expectancy-overdose-epidemic/

By Claire Sasko

WHYY:

Raynard Washington, chief epidemiologist for the Philadelphia Department of Public Health, said that disparity can be attributed primarily to poverty and social factors.

“Really underlying much of this is the social determinants of health — where people live, the environment in which they live in, their ability to be able to pay their bills, and acquire healthy food at affordable rates,” he said.

https://whyy.org/articles/biggest-health-problems-in-philadelphia-opioids-hiv-poverty/

By Alan Yu

Al Dia:

Amid a “nearly 4-fold” increase in drug overdose deaths in recent years, and a 14 percent uptick in homicides over the previous year, Philadelphia’s life expectancy declined in 2017, a report released last week by the city’s Department of Public Health found.

http://aldianews.com/articles/politics/state-and-local/philadelphia-life-expectancy-declines-due-opioid-crisis-violence

By David Maas

2018 Health of the City Report Issued

Today, Philadelphia Department of Public Health released the second Health of the City annual report, which describes the landscape of health for Philadelphia residents. Many health indicators are improving, but some indicators – particularly those related to opioid use and unhealthy behaviors – are troubling. Among the grimmest findings was that drug overdoses and homicides have caused a decline in life expectancy in Philadelphia. The latest data on teen health has good news though: cigarette use, drinking, sweetened beverage use, teen birth rates, and new cases of sexually-transmitted diseases have all continued to drop.

https://mailchi.mp/phila.gov/health-department-releases-2018-health-of-the-city-report