Crisis Letal: Telemundo Coverage of the Opioid Crisis

Teaser: https://www.telemundo62.com/noticias/local/Serie-investigativa-_Crisis-Letal_-de-T62_TLMD—Philadelphia-491473001.html

Part 1: https://www.telemundo62.com/noticias/destacados/Crisis-Letal-Vertiginoso-ascenso-en-muertes-por-sobredosis-filadelfia-pensilvania-alexandra-zenteno-jose-lopez-thomas-farley-493088501.html

Part 2: https://www.telemundo62.com/noticias/destacados/Crisis-Letal-Ansian-el-cambio-de-lo-que-ven-como-normal-filadelfia-pensilvania-drogas-muertes-sobredosis-493192481.html

Part 3: https://www.telemundo62.com/noticias/destacados/Crisis-Letal-Empoderan-todo-aquel-que-ayude-filadelfia-pensilvania-departamento-de-salud-naloxone-493333991.html

By Iris Delgado and Rita Portela

Response to Rosenstein OpEd 3

“Just as local governments had to lead during the HIV epidemic, cities like ours will be on the forefront of saving lives in the opioid crisis,” James Garrow, a spokesman for Philadelphia’s Department of Public Health, said in a statement Tuesday. “The federal government should focus its enforcement on the pill mills and illegal drug traffickers who supply the poison that is killing our residents, not on preventing public health officials from acting to keep Philadelphians from dying.”

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/cities-defiant-after-justice-departments-threat-on-supervised-injection-sites/2018/09/04/fcf798d6-b056-11e8-a20b-5f4f84429666_story.html

By Lenny Bernstein Katie Zezima

Overdose Awareness Day Press Release

PHILADELPHIA–In response to a public health crisis unlike anything in the last century, the City of Philadelphia recognizes International Overdose Awareness Day. This is a global event held on August 31st every year that aims to raise awareness of overdose and reduce the stigma of a drug-related death.

https://mailchi.mp/phila.gov/international-overdose-awareness-day-and-new-online-city-resources

Overdose Awareness Day Recognition

Philadelphia had close to 1,300 overdose deaths last year — the vast majority from opioids — and almost 300 in the first quarter of this year. And if you think those statistics are far removed from your life and reflect a moral failing on the part of the victims, Health Department spokesman James Garrow says, that is exactly why the city chose to observe this day.

“This day really hopes to bring it out into light that overdose happens to regular people and we should all be more cognizant of the humanity that’s suffering with these problems,” Garrow said.

https://kywnewsradio.radio.com/articles/news/philadelphia-health-officials-observe-overdose-awareness-day

By Pat Loeb

Response to Rosenstein OpEd 2

A spokesperson for the city said in an email that federal authorities were focusing on the wrong thing.

“The federal government should focus its enforcement on the pill mills and illegal drug traffickers who supply the poison that is killing our residents, not on preventing public health officials from acting to keep Philadelphians from dying,” the spokesperson said. “Instead of threatening cities and states, they should bring possible solutions to the table that will save lives.”

http://www.phillytrib.com/news/philly-undeterred-by-federal-warning-on-drug-injection-havens/article_33cefeef-9ed8-5fb5-94eb-4a4428aeb38b.html

By John Mitchell

Response to Rosenstein OpEd

James Garrow, a spokesman for the health department, said Rosenstein’s op-ed doesn’t change the evidence showing that overdose prevention sites save lives.

“The federal government should focus its enforcement on the pill mills and illegal drug traffickers who supply the poison that is killing our residents, not on preventing public health officials from acting to keep Philadelphians from dying,” he said.

https://www.politico.com/story/2018/08/28/san-franciscos-safe-injection-sites-justice-department-759017

By Victoria Colliver, Dan Goldberg, and Rachel Roubein

Pennsylvania Overdose Death Stats

Thomas Farley, Philadelphia’s health commissioner, said the new state-level data suggest that Pennsylvania’s opioid crisis is no longer confined to urban areas.

 

“We’ve always had a bigger heroin problem than the rest of the state,” he said. “What I’m struck by is how much of a problem we have in the rural areas that were previously untouched by this. The opioid crisis is raging through Pennsylvania like the wildfires are raging through California.”

 

He said the rise in fentanyl-related overdoses was particularly concerning.

 

“That’s the top drug here — and it’s 50 times as potent as heroin, much more likely to get people addicted, much more likely to cause an overdose,” he said. “It’s changed the entire nature of the problem.”

http://www2.philly.com/philly/health/addiction/fentanyl-is-killing-more-and-more-people-in-pennsylvania-20180821.html

By Aubrey Whelan